A TNR Newbie’s Basic Toolkit

I am by no means an expert cat trapper, but I have learned a lot in the last 18 months or so that I have been trapping neighborhood cats in my yard. One important thing I have learned is the value of having all of your equipment and tools handy so you’re ready when a cat steps into the trap.

Here are the things I keep handy when I trap.

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Trap: I love my “Fat Cat” Tru Catch trap. It’s bigger than a typical cat-size trap, so there’s a little extra space for kitty while he or she is recovering in the garage after surgery.

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Fork: To go with the trap, I have a Tru Catch fork. I use the fork to keep kitty to one end of the trap while I clean or put in fresh water and food. It allows me to take better care of the cat while it’s in my trap, and it keeps us both safe (and kitty in the trap!).

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Leather gloves: I’m vegan and have refused to buy leather gloves for myself for years. I don’t wear leather clothing or shoes. But, I get the safety reasons for leather gloves. Sharp teeth and claws can’t get through the leather and to my skin; other fabrics and materials just don’t provide that coverage. My husband gave me these gloves last Christmas with a pair of Kevlar knitted gloves that go most of the way up my arm. I’m not 100 percent comfortable with it, but I understand that I need to be safe. If I get sick or hurt, I may not be able to help as many cats (or worse). It’s a balancing act for me.

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Carabiner: It’s a small thing, but this carabiner gives me a lot of peace of mind. It keeps the sliding door of my trap closed. I know it’s unlikely a cat will open it and escape, but I feel more comfortable with the door latched. Cats are smart!

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Blankets, Sheets, and Towels: As soon as you get a cat in the trap, you should cover it. This relaxes the cat and stops it from thrashing around in the cage. I leave the trap covered with a blanket or sheet the entire time the cat is recovering in my garage. I use the towels under the trap in the garage so that the cat isn’t sitting directly on the cold floor. The towels are also helpful for catching urine and feces. It makes it easier to keep the trap clean.

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Newspaper: Since it’s tricky to get a blanket or towel into the trap (and in my experience, the cats are going to spill water and food in the trap anyway), I use newspaper over the bottom of the trap. This catches waste and makes it a little more comfortable (hopefully) than sitting on the wire bottom of the trap. When the trap is set, the newspaper helps cover the trip plate.

Bowls and food: I have a separate set of bowls and food for outdoor cats. I feed my outdoor cats a middle-quality food; it’s better than cheap store brand food that is full of fillers, but it is not as expensive as the grain-free food we give Aine, Emmett, and Seamus. I try to strike a balance between quality food and my budget; I need to be able to afford to keep feeding the outdoor cats.

An expert on speed dial: Whether it’s a fellow trapper, rescue group or TNR-friendly vet or vet tech, have someone you can call when you have questions or run into difficulties. Most times, the process will go seamlessly, but every so often, you’ll hit a snag. I’ve been grateful for my friends at Rescue Angels of Southern Maryland who answer my calls and texts when I have TNR questions.

What else would you add to a beginner’s TNR kit?

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